HOW TO PHOTOGRAPH SHELTER PETS

Photo by: Eric Delmar, Montclair Animal Shelter, Montclair, NJ

Photo by: Eric Delmar, Montclair Animal Shelter, Montclair, NJ

BASEMEANT WRX’S FIRST GALLERY NIGHT WAY BACK WHEN IN 2015 WAS LOCAL NJ PHOTOGRAPHER ERIC DELMAR. ERIC’S PHOTOGRAPHY JUST MAKES YOU FEEL CALM. HIS SUBTLE TECHNICAL ABILITY ALLOWS THE FAMILIAR SUBJECT MATTER TO SHINE.

BEING THE GOOD SOUL THAT HE IS, ERIC DONATES HIS TIME TO PHOTOGRAPHING THE RESCUE PETS AT THE MONTCLAIR ANIMAL SHELTER. HE HAS BEEN INVOLVED WITH HELPING TO SHOWCASE THE DOGS & CATS THAT ARE AVAILABLE FOR ADOPTION FOR THE PAST FEW YEARS. HIS PHOTOGRAPHY REALLY CAPTURES THE RESCUE PETS’ SPIRIT. AND THE GLAMOUR SHOTS HELP TO CATCH POTENTIAL ADOPTERS’ ATTENTION & INCREASE THEIR CHANCES OF FINDING A FOREVER HOME.

SO OF COURSE, US BEING VERY PROUD OWNERS OF OUR RESCUE DOGS STEW AND LUCY, WE 100% SUPPORT AND LOVE ERIC FOR USING HIS TALENT FOR GOOD.

AND ISN’T THAT THE BEST KIND OF VOLUNTEER WORK? THE KIND THAT ALLOWS YOUR SPECIAL GIFT TO SHINE AND HELP OTHERS AT THE SAME TIME?

SO, IF YOU ARE A PHOTOGRAPHER THAT IS INTERESTED IN HELPING YOUR LOCAL ANIMAL SHELTER, CHECK OUT ERIC’S LATEST POST ON HIS SITE FOR A HOW TO GUIDE.

ERIC MAPS OUT FROM A TO Z WHAT YOU NEED TO GET STARTED & HOW TO CAPTURE AND EDIT GREAT PHOTOS OF DOGS & CATS IN ANIMAL SHELTERS.

IN OUR SOCIAL MEDIA WORLD, BEING ABLE TO SHARE GREAT IMAGES OF THESE ANIMALS IS KEY TO FINDING THEM GOOD HOMES.

CLICK HERE: ERIC DELMAR “SHELTER SHOTZ”

When You're Creative, You're Creative

Hey Guys! Long time no see. I was on a roll with this blog thing and then life happened I guess. But we are back. And I am going to tell you about another side project that we have been working on this past year that has ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with Furniture.

But isn't that the best part? That Chris (tattooed, bearded, SUPER FRIENDLY CHRIS) has had this whole lifelong career designing infant toys. I know! Who knew?

So as fate has it, Chris designed these super funky soft toys for babies that meshed different animals together and had big googly eyes and pouffy tails. We loved them but they never went anywhere. It was kinda a shame that only Evie could enjoy them. Our best friend Lex who is an avid reader, writer, movie buff, hermit crab introvert said she wrote a story about one of them.

 

The story was about how a baby (in this case our Evie) imagined her best friend Ollie.

Lex was one of those kids that had a ton of imaginary friends. Apparently imaginary friends are super common. Most children have them, though only some really remember.

I had one named Sam (because Sammantha was my favorite American Girl Doll- the Original American Girl Dolls- dating myself I know). But I really just wanted a break from my sisters I think. 

Anyway, quick backstory done... Here is Inklings

Inklings come from the idea that a tiny spark in a child's imagination can create something wonderful and unique. The stories that accompany each Inkling show how a single spark can create a caring imaginary best friend.

Because children aren't held back by what things are "supposed" to be, they are free to imagine and create without limitations and free to love without prejudice. Inklings are genderless and the children who imagine them are diverse. We believe in a world where creativity, kindness and acceptance are virtues that should be admired. We want to help bring that idea to this new generation.  Our goal is to create many unique Inklings and write additional stories for each to teach those key values.  We at Inklings think that girl toys and boy toys are old news and that's why we designed inklings with every child in mind. 

Inklings Ollie and infant novel.jpg

We just launched our Kickstarter campaign to fund our first production, which includes the infant novel "Evie & Ollie the Oddball Oddbird" and Ollie the soft toy.

Day 5 and we are currently 70% funded which is awesome. We have 30 days to reach our goal.

And Kickstarter selected us as a "Project they love" which definitely gave us some much needed validation. 

Here is our Kickstarter link if you want to check out the super cute video that Lex made starring a few babies we know... Also my longtime buddy Dan Olivo from Slow Cities created the background music, because fortunately we have some pretty talented friends. 

 

It would mean the world to us if you would share our campaign with anyone you think might be interested. A new parent, grandparent, baby... you get the gist. The more pledges we get the more Inklings we can make.  Check us out on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snail Mail...

We already have this two on deck patiently waiting... 

Here is our website

Here is our Instagram

Here is our Facebook

Please feel free to reach out with feedback, comments, ideas, wine HERE

K hopefully we talk soon and I don't disappear because we actually have some real furniture news, more life news (REAL QUICK WE ARE MOVING!!! AND THERE IS A 2 STORY HISTORIC BARN) STAY TUNED...

love,

~aim

 

TRY & MAKE JUST ABOUT ANYTHING

CUSTOM, CUSTOM, CUSTOM

One of our first random Custom Order Requests was for a large Magnet Board. A new client walked into our shop, took a look around and we started chatting. She asked if we would build her something custom. I said, "Sure!" because why not, right?

The client just remodeled her beautiful kitchen and like most stainless fridges, it wasn't magnetic. She had school aged kids with tons of papers, schedules, to-do lists, etc that needed a home. Instead of a bulletin board or chalkboard she thought of hanging a magnet board. Only she couldn't seem to find one. 

On her 2nd visit she brought the gorgeous tiles that she used for her kitchen remodel. She envisioned a metal board framed in chunky reclaimed wood with a matching stain to her countertops and a tile in each corner

Mag Board.jpg
 

I drew a quick sketch of the details we discussed, showed Chris to confirm a price quote and made a few stain options for the client to take home to confirm. 

(I was thinking of editing the sketch photo to look more professional but literally thats how things actually get done....)

stain.jpg

Once the details get hashed out we normally take a 50% deposit for materials and also for security so the client doesn't back out, which is pretty standard. 

Think about it. People always say they will go to something, and then day of they cancel and guess who is stuck paying for a 25 person party bus for her sister's bachelorette? It's ok. Its just in our nature to want to say yes right away instead of knowing ourselves and how we would rather be on our couch drinking wine and looking at the photos of the night on FB.  

Anyway... In this case the price was cheap enough and we hadn't put the deposit rule in place so I said check was fine once completed. We had her super fancy tiles so I figured she meant business. 

Ok so for the project we needed the following:

  • sheet metal to be cut slightly less than 30"x 50"
  • reclaimed wood - Chris used his stash of reclaimed pine boards 
  • figure out the tile inlay in the corners
  • strong enough wire hanging set up on the top back
  • confirm stain options

Metal Supermarket! My home away from home! I say "my" because Chris had never actually been there until I was 8 months pregnant and I said, "I am not planning on coming here and carrying out 20 ft of tubing with a 2 month old so you need to meet the guys so you can handle our future orders." The Metal Supermarket in Fairfield IS THE BEST. I love them. Like would invite them to Thanksgiving... or at least for a beer.  

So I stopped there to get a sheet cut for the project and pick up a few other things Chris needed. It is definitely not a "supermarket" like you are picturing with florescent lights but more of a metal supply shop with an office in the front, warehouse in the back stocked with all kinds of metal tubing and angle and what not in different sizes and and shapes. The guys help you select what you need, price it out, cut it down and then load it into your car out back. Its the easiest most comfortable way for some random girl to buy metal and not feel out of place. 

Chris started the project and ran into the whole, "Oh I didn't think this whole router situation through for the tile inlay." But like most things, the internet helped... And epoxy. Lots of epoxy. I am considering buying stock in West Systems Epoxy. 

Finished project.

There were definitely things that we learned along the way, which is what happens every time you try something new. (I usually have to remind Chris this over and over). 

The client was happy. We were psyched to make our first real custom project that was client designed. And we quickly realized that our Pop Up Shop was more of a "showroom" where clients could get an idea of what we do, then come to us with what they needed. 

God I miss that black and white checked plywood floor...

TESTING OUT THE GO PRO

 

So you know how you see those build videos showing how people make things? 

Well Chris and I are on Youtube all the time for everything. Be it he is trying to figure out a construction detail or I am trying to puree baby food, Youtube has it all. 

We thought, "Hey let's film Chris building something!" I mean how hard can it be right? 

SUPER HARD. 

 

"It's supposed to be hard. If it wasn't hard everyone would do it.  It's the hard that makes it great." 

Thanks Tom Hanks. Right again. 

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So we got ourselves a Go Pro Hero 3 Black with some of the attachments thrown in. This was of course after countlessly researching the differences between all the damn iterations, checking Let Go, Offer Up, Craigslist and eBay for deals and steals.

WHAT CAME NEXT:

  • Went to Target to get the memory card.
  • Went back to Target to get the right memory card.
  • Read the manual to set up the camera.
  • Watched Youtube videos about Go Pro Tips & Tricks.
  • Downloaded the Go Pro app Capture to link to camera. This is so you can actually see what you are filming and not go at it blind.
  • Tested out the Go Pro by filming us driving to pick up wood for a project at End Grain in Bloomfield. (Riveting Stuff) Resulting footage almost made me vomit from nausea. 
  • Bought additional batteries and charger station because only 2 hour battery life. 
  • Filmed lots of footage from a variety of angles of Chris building the easels we used for the Wayne Lincoln Art & Car event in Montclair, NJ.
  • Used the Go Pro Studio software to edit. 
  • Realized that you can't stabilize super shaky footage in Go Pro Studio. 
  • Used the iMovie program to really edit and straighten out the shaky footage.
  • Found out you can't use just any old song for the background because of copyright infringement and all that jazz. 
  • Youtubed how to stop shooting shaky footage on a Go Pro...

And here we are folks. My first real attempt at a basic build video. Not gonna lie, its pretty crappy. But we all have to start somewhere right?